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Arrivals in 1839, 1840, 1841,

They came on the Glen Huntley
as Self-funded and as Bounty Immigrants in 1840

Glenhuntly

arrived 17 April 1840, left Greenock, Scotland 14 Dec 1839 and reached Port Phillip 17 April 1840, Captain John Patterson Master, Superintendent Surgeon James Brown.

Deaths at Sea - 12 names George Armstrong 48 on 4 Mar, James Methers 38 on 6 Mar, John Craig 40 on 14 March, Messer on 2 Apr, Mrs Brisbane 40 on 8 Apr, Robert Cummins 23 on 9 Apr, Alex McDonald 25 on 10 Apr, Alexander Smith on 10 Apr, Jane Patterson 26 on 11 Apr, Thomas Harper on 12 Apr, George Denlan 35 on 17 Apr
James Mather was aboard this vessel which sailed from Greenock, Scotland. It is noted on his gravestone in Montrose that he died "aboard" this ship. He was 39 yrs. old. Glen Huntley memorial in St Kilda Cemetery. 7 children died before they left Greenock in mid Dec 1839.

Appears to be a total of 154 survivors - 114 people in families, 12 single females over 14 yrs, and 28 single men over 17 yrs
ShipCouplesParentsDau+15 Dau+7Dau+1Infantsson+1 sons+7sons+14Familiesfemalesmen

Bounty

Glen Huntly61941442515 71221428154
Typhoid and measles caused at least 16 deaths, during voyage and Port Phillip's first Quarantine event
Margaret Whitlock 14 died 31 Dec 1839 (z ), listed on the Glenhuntly

The Bounty names

John Anderson 28
George Armstrong 48
Walter Armstrong 18
James Brisbane family
Anne Burney/Burnie19
Duncan Cameron family
Edwin Cameron/Cunominfamily
Chas Clark/Clarkefamily
Nicol Clark/Clarkefamily
Angus Craig 22
Donald Craig 31
John Craig 40
Flora Cummins died
John Davidson/Dairdson family
Mary Denham 27
John Dingwill family
William Duff 20
Alexander Fraser/Fraser22
Margery Fraser/Fraser20
Samuel Fraser/Fraser-
James Grant
Thomas Grant family
Thomas Harper family
Anne/Amy Henderson 19
Erspel Hewson/Hewison27
James Kirkwood 18
Donald Maskell/Maskill24
Alexander Mathewson 21
Donald Mathewson 26
Donald Mcaskel/Mccaskelfamily
Catherine Mcdonald 63
Donald Mcdonald 22
Flora Mcdonald 22
Alexander Mcdougal 26
John Mcgregor family
Donald Mcintosh 40
Hugh Mckay/Mccoy33
Anne Mckenny/Mckinny27
Alexander 1 Mckenzie -
Alexander 2 Mckenzie 27
David Mckenzie 24
Mary Mckenzie 38
Angus Mckinan/Mckinan26
Duncan Mckinnon family
George Mckinnon family
James Mclaren family
William Mcleery/Mccleery27
Sarah Mcleod 21
Jane Mcoll/Mccoll28
Duncan Mcpherson family
Robert Mercer/Misser family
James Methers died
Isabella Munro 20
Jane Nicol 35
Eliza Nicol 14
Jane Pattison died
Hugh Robertson 24
Jane Roy 50
Joseph Roy 22
James Roy 20
William Roy 18
Ellen Roy 16
James Smith 26
William Smith family
Mrs Somerville 65
James Somerville 33
Louisa Somerville 19
Alexander Stewart couple
Robert Stow/Stowe25
Jane Tait 25
Donald Teat 26
James Turnbull family
William Walker 18
Moses Ward family
George E Young 26

Not included in "The Somerset Years", by Florence Chuk, as no passenger came from Somerset.

"Perilous Journeys to the New Land" by Michael Cannon, page 23 - 32 has a chapter on the disasters encountered by the immigrants on the Glen Huntley. Page 28 he notes ' A partial death list of the Glen Huntley sufferers has survived.

From The Port Phillip Herald, Tuesday, April 21, 1840, Shiipping Arrivals.
April 17 Glen Huntley, barque, 430 tons, Captain Buchanan, from Greenock and Oban, Argyleshire, with 157 Governmaent emigrants.

Separate Report - The Glen Huntley ... arrived on Friday last, and has been placed in quarantine in consequence of the existance of disease among the emogrants. It seems that at the outset of the voyage small-pox broke out among the children, and the vessel in consequence put back to port, where she was detained a month.
On the outward passage a fever, said to be of a bilious nature, made its appearance among the emigrants and carried off ten adults. There were no deaths for 10 days previous to the vessel arriving in port, but there are still a considerable number of cases of sickness.
A quarantine station has been formed on the beach adjoining the Little Red Bluff, about four miles from Melbourne, and a guard of soldiers has been sent down to prevent communication between the station and the town. His Honour has requested Captain Roach (who is intimately acquainted with the routine of quarantine duties) to assist him in the arrangement and management of the quarantine station, and this gentleman, accompanied by Captain Smith, proceeded with the Superintendent on Sunday to fix the site and make the preliminary arrangements for handling the emigrants, which, it is supposed, will be done tomorrow.

Tuesday, April 28, 1840 -

The Quarantine Station

The sick of the Glen Huntley were all landed on Friday last, and the healthy on Sunday. We regret to learn that six new cases made their appearance on Sunday morning. No fresh deaths have taken place since (arriving).
His Honour the Superintendent is unremitting in his endeavours to mitigate the sufferings of the unfortunate emigrantsm and frequently personally attends at the Quarantine Station to see that their wants are properly attended to. We fear that the malady is much more virulent than it has been represented

Since the above was in type, we have been favoured by Dr Cutter with the following letter, which we publish for public information -
"Healthy Camp, Quarantine Station, Monday April 27, 1840,
The remainder of the emigrants were landed yesterday from the Glen Huntley, with an addition of six fresh cases for the sick camp. There are at present in the healthu camp one hundred and eight, including children; many of them appear much emaciated from long and continued illness, but I have every reason to hope that the change of quarters and diet will soon restore them. Reports from the sick camp are favourable this morning.
A female, named Ann Cummins, belonging to the healthy camp, was very muchgh injured by a fall from the bank on to the beach, the accident has only this moment occured. The emogrants in the healthy camp as far as I can yet judge appear to be a very well conducted set of people."

From a St Kilda web site, featuring Mckenzie, now lost
Departed: 14 Dec 1839 - Geenock, Scotland
Arrived: 17 Apr 1840 - Port Phillip, Vic.
Master: Captain John Buchanan
Particulars: 505t barque ; travelled via Oban
Notes: Eighteenth of the original Bounty Scheme ships ; approximately 160 passengers including 25-year-old Alexander McKenzie and his cousin, also named Alexander McKenzie. Outbreak of typhoid fever during the journey, resulting in Victoria's first quarantine - a temporary camp on the beach at Point Ormond. 15 passengers died on the voyage, and 3 further deaths occurred on the beach.

In 1840 the barque, the ‘Glen Huntly’ glided into Port Phillip Bay. She was on her maiden voyage from Greenock in Scotland, carrying immigrants who would provide much needed labour for the new colony. Carpenters, housemaids, shoemakers, labourers and tailors were among the people with highly sought after skills.

But by the time the ship moored off Elwood’s shore, only 52 of the original 190 passengers had survived the journey. The others had died en route. Instead of being welcomed and cheered, the ship’s appearance was regarded by the fledgling colony with fear, for it was flying a yellow flag - a sign that there was ‘fever’ on board, very probably typhoid. Port Phillip’s superintendent

Charles La Trobe, ordered that a quarantine camp be set up on Little Red Bluff, as Point Ormond was then known. Soldiers were appointed to ensure there was no escape. So these poor souls, through no fault of their own, became the inhabitants of Victoria’s first quarantine station. Many were desperately ill and weak and in May three more died there - George Armstrong, James Mathers and John Craig. They were buried on the cliff top overlooking the sea.

The camp was divided into two parts and strictly policed, one group of tents allocated for the sick or infectious, and the others for the healthy. As the sick recovered they were transferred to the ‘healthy’ section. Provisions were trundled down the rough track (that would become Glenhuntly Road) to cater for the needs of the internees. And the last emigrant wouldn’t leave quarantine until June 13, 1840.

So chilling was the story of the ‘Glen Huntly’ that Olive Moore, [a descendent by marriage of Alexander McKenzie (Red Sandy)], published a book about the horrific journey in 1990. ‘Flying the Yellow Flag’ provides accurate historical detail of the events that led to an overcrowded barque, smaller than the Polly Woodside, setting out without a clean bill of health for the long voyage to Australia. The story is integral to the history and development of Elwood and Victoria.

A cairn set in the lee at Point Ormond gives an account of the historical events and lists the names of the immigrants who landed there. The bodies of the three men who died after landing are now contained in an elaborate grave in the St Kilda Cemetery (South West corner). Another testament to the pioneers, in the form of a ceramic tile designed by artist Hedley Potts, lies set in the recently restored Elwood Pier.

The Book ‘Flying the Yellow Flag’ can be obtained from author Olive Moore for $A12 (includes P&H) , PO Box 6006, RINGWOOD EAST 3135. Olive Moore for $A12 (includes P&H) , PO Box 6006, RINGWOOD EAST 3135.

On December 13th 1839 the emigrant ship ‘Glen Huntly’ left Greenock, Scotland and arrived at Hobsons’ Bay on 17th April 1840. Many of the passengers suffering from fever were landed at the Red Bluff, St Kilda on 24 April 1840. That being the first Quarantine Station in Victoria. A few days later JOHN CRAIG, JAMES MATHERS, GEORGE ARMSTRONG succumbed to the disease and were interred at the Bluff. Owing to the encroachment of the sea their remains were exhumed and removed to the St Kilda Cemetery on 27th August 1898 by the Board of Public Health

Rootsweb query -
I have located this ship ‘Glen Huntly’ on the AUSNZ website as arriving Port Phillip, Victoria Bay, April, 1840 (no "day" mentioned). A family relative, James Mather/Methers, was aboard this vessel which sailed from Greenock, Scotland. It is noted on his gravestone in Montrose that he died "aboard" this ship. He was 39 yrs. old. However, I'm wondering if there is anything recorded about problems on board the Glenhuntly before its arrival, i.e. fire, storm, etc. If anyone has information he/she could pass on, I would be most appreciative. Just what was it like sailing the "high seas" in those days??

Answer
On 7 April, 1840, the ship Glen Huntly arrived in Port Phillip Bay with fever on board. There has been a book written on the journey and its aftermath, "Flying the Yellow Flag" by Olive Moore still, I think, available from the Australian Institute of Genealogical Studies.

From Wikipedia
Glen Huntly is named after a ship, the Glen Huntly, that arrived in Port Phillip Bay in 1840, after setting off from Greenock, Scotland. She was carrying 190 new immigrants, skilled manual labourers who were heading for the new colony settled in Melbourne. Fever, most likely typhoid, struck the ship mid journey and only 50 people survived to reach Port Phillip Bay. The Glen Huntly was forced to land at Little Red Bluff (now Point Ormond) and Victoria's first quarantine station was formed to deal with the crisis. Supplies and provisions were brought down what is now Glen Huntly Road and the small town was formed.
From Subculture Creations has a page on the Voyage
In 1840 the barque, the ‘Glen Huntly’ glided into Port Phillip Bay. She was on her maiden voyage from Greenock in Scotland, carrying immigrants who would provide much needed labour for the new colony. Carpenters, housemaids, shoemakers, labourers and tailors were among the people with highly sought after skills.
But by the time the ship moored off Elwood’s shore, only 52 of the original 190 passengers had survived the journey. The others had died en route. Instead of being welcomed and cheered, the ship’s appearance was regarded by the fledgling colony with fear, for it was flying a yellow flag - a sign that there was ‘fever’ on board, very probably typhoid. Port Phillip’s superintendent Charles La Trobe, ordered that a quarantine camp be set up on Little Red Bluff, as Point Ormond was then known. Soldiers were appointed to ensure there was no escape. So these poor souls, through no fault of their own, became the inhabitants of Victoria’s first quarantine station.
My summary of the page (now vanished) http://turnbullclan.com/tca_genealogy/tca_all-p/p927.htm Glen Huntley records voyage. 7 children died before they left Greenock in mid Dec 1839 --------- In the Australian Dictionary of Biography, Agnes Bunting nee Davidson

AGNES BUNTINE nee Davidson, (c.1822-1896), pastoralist and bullocky, was born at Glasgow, Scotland, eldest of six children of John Davidson, crofter, and his wife Sarah, née Wallace. Agnes Davidson married Hugh Buntine. Hugh Buntine (1803-1867), a former neighbour at Little Netheraith, Ayrshire, who had emigrated in 1838 with his wife Mary and five children. Mary had died of typhoid in Sydney quarantine station and Hugh had moved to Melbourne, purchasing farming land on the Richmond Flats. In April 1840, when the Davidsons arrived in the barque, Glenhuntly, Buntine arranged employment for the parents. Agnes worked locally as a dairymaid then married Hugh Bunten on 30 October in Melbourne with Presbyterian forms.

Agnes Davidson (c.1822-1896), pastoralist and bullocky, was born at Glasgow, Scotland, eldest of six children of John Davidson, crofter, and his wife Sarah, née Wallace. The family left Scotland in December 1839, probably at the urging of brick and tile maker Hugh Buntine (1803-1867), a former neighbour at Little Netheraith, Ayrshire, The Buntines established a dairy farm on Merri Creek then, attracted by the prospect of fertile land in Gippsland, they built a hut near Port Albert in July 1841. In September Agnes gave birth to Albert, thought to be the first white child born in Gippsland. After running cattle and a small inn at Morris Creek, outside Tarraville, by 1845 the couple established Bruthen Creek station—almost 8000 acres (3240 ha). Five more children were born between 1843 and 1855 (only Sarah Wallace Buntine was christened when a church was established in the area).
By 1858 they had moved to a farm at Flynns Creek, near Rosedale. Hugh was ill; then died. On 17 February 1873 at Sale, with Presbyterian forms, she married 29-year-old Michael Dawe Hallett, an English-born farmer, and retired as a bullocky, the couple continuing to farm at Flynns Creek. Agnes died on 29 February 1896 in Gippsland Hospital, Sale, survived by her husband and by one son and three daughters of her first marriage. -------

--- James Turnbull James Turnbull1,2 M, #50271, b. circa 1791, d. 11 March 1860 * Birth*: James Turnbull was born circa 1791 at Northumberland, Scotland.1,3
* Death*: He died on 11 March 1860 at Yarra Bank, Richmond, Victoria, Australia.4
* Burial*: He was buried on 13 March 1860 at Old Cemetery, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
* Occupation*: He was a Shepherd.
* Emigration*: He emigrated circa 1840; to Melbourne, NSW, Arrived on the 'Glen Huntly'.
* Note*: He Little is known about James' life prior to his arrival in Australia.
From his death certificate we know that he was born and married in Northumberland England. The family obviously moved to either the parish of Ross and Cromarty or Sutherland in Scotland. Their daughter Mary was christened in Edderton in Ross and Cromarty, while their son William's marriage certificate indicates he was born in Sutherland.

In the Old Parochial Records for Sutherland, Scotland, there are no births or christenings listed for James Turnbull and Isabella Ord, however there are entries for the christening of children born to James and Isabella (Bell) Turnboll in Eddrachillis whose names and christening years correspond with the children of James Turnbull and Isabella Ord. Therefore we can only assume that these are the same family. The records also show that James and Isabella Turnboll had a son Mathew, who was christened on 18 December 1828. If this is the family which migrated to Australia, we presume that Mathew died in infancy.

James and his family minus their eldest son Richard received assisted passage to Australia under the bounty scheme. This scheme encouraged settlers in Australia to sponsor immigrants into the country. The settlers received a 'bounty' for special classes of workers and the scheme was financed through the sale of crown land to colonists.

The Turnbull family were unfortunate to join the The Glenhuntley which was on its maiden voyage. The vessel was smaller than the more well known Polly Woodside. The Glenhuntley set sail from Greenock for Oban in the Scottish highlands on 19 October 1839 to receive on board passengers who were bound for Australia. Among the 190 immigrants were housemaids, tailors, labourers, carpenters and shoemakers whose skills were highly sought in Australia.

In a letter from T F Elliot dated 13 December 1839 to the Lieutant Governor at Port Philip [Supt La Trobe] and a report by Dr John Brown Superintendent Surgeon aboard the vessel, we learn that the Glen Huntley struck rock going into Oban requiring her to return to Greenock for repair. However he passengers were duly taken aboard and on 30 October 1839 set sail to return to Greenock for repair however she again struck rock coming out of Oban. This turned out to be the start of the troubles aboard the ill fated Glen Huntley.

Upon reaching Greenock on 7 November 1839 the Glen Huntley was put into dock for repair with the passengers remaining on board. Scarlatina and measles broke out amongst the passengers preventing the vessel putting to sea. Two cases of Eruptive Disorder one of which was later diagnosed as smallpox occurred towards the end of November. The sick passengers were transferred from the Glen Huntley to the Greenock Infirmary and would not return until the danger of infection had passed. The healthy passengers remained on board and were innoculated for smallpox. By the time the Glen Huntley put to sea in mid December 1839, seven children had died.

'Determined [Doctors Boyter and I] as the least of two evils to put to sea, convinced that by removing from a cold damp dismal climate like what we had then, into a warmer and drier "it would be the best way to get rid of disease and restore the people to health & spirits nor do I think that all we have suffered that we were wrong. I feel certain that by lying 3 weeks longer at Greenock we would have lost more lives than we have done the whole voyage.' [from the report by Surgeon Brown]

The report further indicates that after setting sail the Glen Huntley met with stormy weather with contrary winds for 3 weeks and had the usual quantity of sea sickness. From the time they left Greenock until the 7 January 1840 they had a further 7 cases of smallpox; 6 mild cases except one that of a boy who died on the morning of the 1st January. There were also several cases of scarlatina where a further two children died. By the time the vessel reached Maderia the weather had become more favourable and the smallpox and scarlatina no longer remained. However there were occassionally cases of partial fever but by the time the vessel reached the equator the fever assumed all appearances of regular Fever. From this time 'until they came to St Pauls east of Cape of Good Hope on 15th March this disease continued to attack individuals here and there all over the ship, not apparently [except perhaps in one family, the Turnbulls all delicate] as if from infection and generally the symptons bore a favorable aspect.'

After leaving St Pauls until reaching Port Phillip the weather was unusually cold, stormy and uncomfortable with the fever becoming more general and fatal with 3 men and 3 women dying.

When the Glenhuntley sailed into Port Phillip Bay on 17 April 1840 it was flying a yellow flag indicating there was a fever on board.

As the fever was thought to be Typhoid, under the orders of Port Phillip's superintendent Victoria's first quarantine station was set up at Little Red Bluff, St Kilda [now Point Ormond]. The station consisted of Tents and was arranged into two sections, 1section for the heathly and the other section catered for patients suffering from the fever. The first of the passengers were transferred to the camp on the 24 April 1840. The station was guarded by soldiers to ensure no-one escaped. Food and supplies were carted down a rough track that is now known as Glenhuntley Road. As the patients recovered from the fever they were transferred to the Healthy section. Three passengers died within days of landing in Australia. Of the 190 immigrants who left Scotland for Australia on 52 survived.

Although the Turnbulls were described by the ships Surgeon as delicate they managed to survive and were put into the healthy section of the camp.

Under the bounty scheme James was assigned to work for Mr Munroe c/- Bourke's for 12 months. For this period he was to receive rations and 40 pounds. The passenger list for the Glenhuntley indicates that James was 49 years of age and a shepherd by trade.

The family lived in Burnley Street, North Richmond and later owned land on the Yarra River.

James died at the age of 69 years from Febris Typhris which he had for 15 days. He was buried on 13 March 1860 at the Old Cemetery, Melbourne. The death certificate indicates that at the time of his death, James was a gardener and that he was 22 years old when he married Isabella Ord in Northumberland England.

James together with other members of his family were originally buried in site 394 of the Old Cemetery in Melbourne, however around 1922, 900 bodies were exhumed from the cemetery to allow for expansion of the Melbourne Market. The records show that the Turnbull grave was one of those exhumed and interred into site 351/2 of the Fawkner Cemetery. A headstone was placed on the grave however no inscriptions were made on it.

As with their early life we can only assume that the bodies of James and Isabella, daughters Jane, Mary, Isabella, Elizabeth and Ann together with Ann's 4 children are located in the Fawkner Cemetery, as in later years when excavating to add the sewerage to the Melbourne Market many bodies were located.

Source of Information: 'Flying the Yellow Flag' complied and written by Olive Moore.
Family: Isabella Ord b. circa 1792, d. circa 1849
* Richard Turnbull b. 16 Apr 1816, d. b 1916
* Unnamed Turnbull b. 10 Feb 1819, d. 1819
* Elizabeth Turnbull b. 29 Dec 1824, d. 1894
* Isabella Turnbull b. 22 Nov 1826, d. 1848
* Matthew Turnbull b. 16 Nov 1828, d. 1829
* Jane Turnbull b. 1 Dec 1829, d. c 1865
* Mary Turnbull b. 15 Jun 1834, d. c 1859

Liardet view of St Kilda where Glen Huntley landed sick passengers
Alexander McKENZIE chr. 3 Sep 1815 Auchlunachan, Loch Broom, Ross Shire, Scotland (parents Norman McKENZIE & Ellen McDONALD) d. 4 Sep 1898 Willowmavin, Vic. (buried Kilmore, Vic.) arrived in Port Phillip April 1840 board the Glen Huntly with his cousin, also named Alexander McKenzie. Alexander was referred to as 'Black Sandy', and his cousin (who later married Janet Grant's sister Marion Sarah) was referred to as 'Red Sandy', the nicknames distinguised the cousins by hair colour.
Duncan McKinnon of Inverness-shire, migrated with his wife Mary Cameron, b. 1816 per "Glen Huntly", arriving Port Phillip April 1840. They lived first at Darebin Creek, Vic, then bought Sheoak Range Station, about 30 km west of Penola, SA.
Andromache, China, Coromandel, Here Himalaya, Isabella Watson, John Bull, Orient, Theresa

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